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Monthly Archives: January 2017

Get Moving Careers

Does it give you the fulfilment you were looking for? Could it have been different, still? For many people, after having been through the past so many years in their current career, they wonder if they are indeed getting the inner fulfilment or inner success that they really wanted.

Consider the following questions:

  1. Do you love and enjoy doing what you do at work?
  2. What are those 3 things that you like most about your current job or career?
  3. What are those 3 things that you dislike the most? What could have been different?
  4. If there was one thing that you would like to change in your career, what would that be?
  5. Do you feel there is something better for you out there?
  6. Assuming you had all the skills and the right beliefs to make changes in your career, then what would your career look like?
  7. Are you in a situation where you want to make a career shift, but do not know what to do?
  8. If yes, then what is holding you back from making that shift?
  9. Have you set any short-term and long-term goals for yourself that you wanted to achieve, and by when? If yes, are you facing any challenges?

These are some powerful questions that you might ask yourself, and you would have noticed that the focus of these questions was more on the inner-self, i.e. what do ‘you’ really want. Could this make your career more enjoyable, rewarding, and fulfilling?

If you said “yes”, then a Career and Performance Coach can help you. Read on to find out how…

There are people who have their jobs but certainly not the dream careers they desired, and wish to transition, while some people are in the process of getting into the right career of their choice. Then, there are others who are doing well in their present careers but want to raise their level of performance. Often, people face roadblocks as they move forward, and there could be psychological, behavioral, or emotional issues that come in the way of their progress. This is where a Career and Performance Coach could help you. A certified Coach supports you in making informed decision about you career development and trajectory. Through an interactive process of inquiry and dialog, the Coach provides you with a deeper insight into yourself, delving into your thoughts and beliefs, understands your motivational triggers, and helps you discover your true potential. The outcome is to make you realise what you really want to do, chart out a clear roadmap, identify and eliminate the limiting beliefs that come in the way of your progress, and guide you towards achieving your goal.

Tactics Find Jobs Online

• Nature of work for freelancers –
Freelancers need to decide conclusively on the nature of the work they are willing to offer. This should mandatorily be in a field they are experienced in, as experienced freelancers inevitably get priority. Freelancers need to be really passionate about the field of work they are involved in and willing to work. As this is a job far from the conventional 9-5 type, passion and discipline is important.

• Pay scale –
After deciding on the type of work, one needs to compare the prevailing prices in the market for freelancers. Depending on the domain, the experience and the credentials, rates differ. The freelancer needs to evaluate his or her value and then decide on a price point.

• Experience –
The employer will definitely look for someone with experience in the field, preferably with references.

• Social media –
One can search for jobs on social media but they must be aware of many fraudulent companies that thrive in social media platforms.

• Online platforms –
After all the groundwork is done, the easiest way to get hired is to go through a hiring portal. As a beginner, no company would be willing to give an independent freelancer a job due to nil accountability. So, this branding of the hiring platform provides a sense of security to the employer as well as offering the freelancer the opportunity. The freelancer would have to send in an updated resume and register with the website. Once a job opening arrives, the aspiring freelancer will be intimated about the client’s requirements. He or she may then be required, at times, to discuss with the client about the specific needs.

Resume Engaging

Engaging Headings
• Use “Core competencies” if you have two to five years of experience or are switching careers. Give categories of your expertise here.
• Use “Professional Expertise” if you have longer work histories. And yes summarize them here.
• Use “Technical Competencies” if you are technically competent. This is a key area especially for people who are applying for technical jobs.

Engaging Experience
1. People end up paying more attention to job duties and descriptions than accomplishments. Don’t do that.
2. Include results, effects and contributions made at your former jobs, along with the company name, job title and years of employment.
3. Keep them short, sweet, concise and compact.
4. State the most important points first.
5. State the most valuable bits first.
6. Avoid stating more than 7.

Engaging Education Highlights
1. Institution, dates attended and the degree or certification you received are listed in the education section.
2. Professional development, continuing education, on-the-job training and other nontraditional education should be included here as well.
3. As a bonus – state something that you are currently doing. Shows you want to learn and grow to become better.

Engaging Finish
1. Over here, add elements that don’t quite fit in any of the other sections.
2. For a technical position, this could include experience with proprietary or customized software.
3. For an executive position, you could include leadership activities.
4. Major awards, recognitions and accomplishments that deserve a little more attention than a detail in another part of the résumé, they can go here.

Engaging All The Way
1. Encapsulate the entire Resume as a package.
2. Have a singularity of Focus & Brand
3. Give the employer something extra to look forward to
4. Ensure everything from the design to the presentation is different
5. Always remember – content is king!

Engaging 101
1. Don’t assume just because you are good at your job, you are also good at Branding, Resume Writing, Interview Skills and Job Searching. Leave this to the Professionals. Being Mentored will improve your chances of being Engaging!

Write Killer Resume

Number One: So, let’s start at the beginning. The first thing you want to put at the top of your resume is your complete contact information. This consists of four things:

• Your full name
• Your mailing address
• Your phone number
• Your email address

While this information may seem like a no-brainer, you will once again be surprised by how many people leave out either their phone number or email address or both! Leaving out this information makes a bad impression on the hiring manager, as you can imagine. Including it at the top saves the hiring manager from searching through your resume hoping to locate it, and it also makes it easy for him/her to reach out to you.

Number Two: Keep the formatting simple. This point could easily have been under the “What to avoid when writing your resume,” but I wanted to put it here as you actually get ready to write it. In a nutshell: Keep it plain and simple. Avoid the following:

Make sure you use text only:

• No shading or lines or borders
• No graphics, logos or fields
• No templates or PDF’s
• No headers or footers or page numbers
• No underlining or special characters

The reason for this is that whenever you submit your email electronically, there is a big chance that your formatting will get improperly transmitted or delivered, and this can easily lead to instantly disqualifying you. It has been estimated that as many as 75% of all resumes never even get seen because of improper formatting!

So KEEP IT SIMPLE

On the other hand, it is O.K., to use ALL CAPS (where appropriate), and to use Bold, or Italics. Use these sparingly, though, and only to make a special point.

Number Three: Think keywords. The content of your resume – your headings, summary of experience, previous job descriptions – should reflect the specific position and job posting you are applying for. Yes, this means that you will want to take a bit of time to tailor your resume for each specific job you are applying for, but it will pay off BIG TIME. Here are a couple of examples:

Summary Section: At the top of your resume, you should include a brief (and I’m talking two or three sentences) “Summary Section” where you list the specific skills and experience you have that match up to the position/job you are applying for. While writing a summary section is often neglected by job applicants, it acts as an easy and quick way for a hiring manager to quickly scan your resume and make a judgement on whether they want to read your resume or not. This is easy (and highly effective) if you just take a few minutes to do it right.

What you do is look at each specific job description you are applying for and pick out the specific skills, duties and responsibilities the job is looking for. So if the job description is looking for “An aggressive prospector/hunter who is used to making outbound calls,” your summary section should list something like this:

I AM AN AGGRESSIVE PROSPECTOR WHO IS USED TO HUNTING FOR ACCOUNTS.

EXCELS WITH EXTENSIVE EXPERIENCE AT MAKING OUTBOUND CALLS TO GENERATE BOTH APPOINTMENTS AND LEADS.

As you can see, this matches up perfectly to what the hiring manager is specifically looking for, and as a result your resume will stand out among the hundreds of others that haven’t taken the time to do this. Remember, keywords like these (“aggressive,” “hunting,” “outbound calls,” are the specific things this hiring manager is looking for, and by making it obvious in your summary section that you possess them, you are in essence saying, “I’m the perfect candidate for you.” Believe me, they will keep reading through your resume.

Previous Experience: Next, you will want to keep listing these keywords throughout your previous job experience at the companies where it is appropriate. At each position where you did outbound calling, make sure and use those same keywords. Something like:

“At Safeco International, I excelled by making an aggressive number of outbound prospecting calls. In this hunter position, I was able to secure as many as five new appointments each day.”

Once again, you will see that as you list these keywords in your previous job experience, the hiring manager will keep nodding his or her head as they think, “This is the kind of person and experience I am looking for.” You should do this with each of the previous jobs you had (again, where it is appropriate), and it’s easy if you keep a copy of the job description in front of you as you tailor your resume.

Here is an example of how to turn a boring description (the kind your competition is submitting) into something that will not only make you stand out, but will make your resume outstanding!