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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Benefits of Contract Jobs

New Connections

During your tenure at a temporary position, you will meet and interact with new people. This helps you to build a professional network, which helps you to stay current in your chosen field. You can also gain advice from trusted sources that helps to improve your skills and lead to additional opportunities.

Trying the Job Out

Contract jobs often last weeks, months, or sometimes longer. This extended length of time working for a company gives you time to decide if the position is the right fit for you. It also allows hiring managers to evaluate your abilities. In the event that a full-time position opens up, if your managers think you are a good fit with the company, you are in a good position to land the job. You and your employer are familiar with one another and you know the job. In some cases, if you are working well, the employer may create a full-time position for you.

Filling the Gaps

Working in a temporary position is no reason to be ashamed. It is a verifiable addition to your employment history. Some managers consider a long-term temporary assignment equivalent to that of a full-time position. By using contract jobs to fill the holes when you have been laid off through no fault of your own, you can avoid being passed over for an interview. Human resource managers know that layoffs are commonplace, however, having a large gap in your employment history can still raise a red flag to potential employers.

Gaining Advice from Staffing Agencies

When you work with a staffing agency, you gain access to several job opportunities. The managers at the agency can point you in the direction of industries they think you will do well in based on your interests and experience. However, getting good gigs is not the only thing you can glean from your time with an agency. In fact, you can get some great career advice during your tenure. They can help you refine your skills and show you additional opportunities for professional development.

Exploring Career in Financial

You can’t just expect to walk in and nab a “plum” financial planner position. You must show proof that you possess the necessary qualifications. A Bachelor’s degree in a financial field is an excellent starting point. It may get you in the door at some places. However, more and more employers are insisting that applicants for financial planning positions possess an MBA. This is especially true if you will be seeking a position that enables you to climb the corporate ladder to a senior management or even partner position.

You Will Need to Obtain Certification as a Financial Planner

The next step to becoming a financial planner is to obtain the necessary certification. The two most well-known types of certifications are Certified Financial Planner (CFP) and Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA). To qualify for the CFP exam, you will need three years’ experience in a finance-related industry. You also will need to have a Bachelor’s degree or better. And, finally, you will need to pass a thorough background check. The exam itself lasts 10 hours and is split over 2 days. To qualify to take the even more grueling CFA exam, you will need four years’ experience.

It Pays to Get Your License to Sell Stocks and Bonds

As a financial planner, being able to sell stocks and bonds is not necessarily a requirement. However, being qualified in this area certainly doesn’t hurt. You can obtain a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) license, such as the Series 6, 7 or 63, to be able to sell mutual funds, stocks, bonds, or insurance to a client. It’s an excellent way to gain more valuable industry experience and qualifications. At the same time, you are also making yourself indispensable to the needs of your clients and your employer.

What is the Career Path of a Modern Financial Planner?

Once you have achieved the necessary college degree to enter the financial industry, your career path will require first gaining three or four years’ worth of experience in junior positions. After gaining the necessary certifications, you will be able to work as a financial planner in an unsupervised capacity.

You will be qualified to receive your base salary, plus incentives and bonuses. That can easily add another five figures to your annual pay. As you work your way upward to a senior position, you can earn a six-figure base salary with matching bonuses and incentives. The career of a financial planner is thus a highly lucrative path to consider.

Experience to Get Part Time Job

Get a few hobbies

Interests are the simplest approach to puff out your resume and give you something to discuss during your interview. Above all, the experience you’ll pick up in interactive with people from more social pastimes is significant. On the off-chance that you can discover a group that you’re interested in, then you’re in good fortune. Generally, all part-time employment will search for evidence that you’re sociable and capable, and a social group is astounding verification.

Volunteer

Volunteering is a clear demonstration of your drive and responsibility. In the event that you can locate a volunteer position in a charity shop, then you’ve viably demonstrated to a potential manager that you’re as of now fit for doing a job (if only retail work). Volunteer positions can be an incredible way to meet individuals who might be looking to hire people, and it’s common to hire people you know over people you don’t, so getting to know members of the public is helpful. Heaps of volunteer positions will utilize more aged individuals who are searching for something to do their seniority. These individuals may have friends who own stores or different organizations that you could work at. It merits recalling the golden rule of finding work: it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.

No experience required positions

A few working environments are glad to contract individuals with zero experience, regularly in light of the fact that it implies that they’re sufficiently gullible to think it won’t be soul-rending. Be that as it may, all you need to do is just stick it out for some time, it can be all that could possibly be needed experience to get your foot in the entryway with other bigger employers. It may appear somewhat discouraging to feel that you’ll need to work your way up the part-time ladder (particularly since that sentence sounds silly), yet it’s a better choice than spending a potentially long time scanning for a vocation without any result when you could instead invest that energy working a terrible job for a little experience.

The spots that will probably employ individuals with zero experience are bigger chains. A decent starting point for finding these spots is asking your companions where they work. The level of experience required for part-time work totally relies on upon where you live. McDonald’s is a reliably good bet however, as are large retail chains.

Job Skill Requirements

Be Yourself!

Perhaps a cliche… but I can’t say this often enough. I just read a popular work advice blog (to remain nameless) and I saw one of the first bits of advice for job interviews was to prepare a slick presentation of yourself and wow them with it. Ouch! While this might perhaps be useful if you are interviewing for a high-powered sales job or maybe an industry like entertainment or advertising (although even there they want to see who they’re really hiring), for most of you doing that will simply trigger a red flag, leaving the interviewer wondering if you’re all bluster and no substance.

Now I’m not saying to be all shy and gawky either (see next section), but real and conversational trumps one-dimensional and slick any time.

Look Me in the Eyes

Not saying stare at me… but when you answer my interview questions, I want to see you connect with me. I’d like to see when your eyes show real enthusiasm about something you’ve accomplished or sincerity about wanting to do a good job for me. Now of course I make room for nervousness, but if I see eyes skittering all about unable to focus on me, how can I be sure you’re being real with me?

Be Confident in Who You Are and What You Have to Offer

Don’t spend time worrying if I think you’re right for the job and what I (the interviewer) am thinking at any given moment. Just know who you are and help me see that. Know that you are a good worker who is reliable and will go the extra mile when called on – or whatever your own strengths are.

Everybody has their own unique strengths. I want to know what they are. So make sure you prepare yourself ahead of time to be able to talk about who you are and/or what you have to offer so that YOU believe it as much as you want them to. It shows.